Dr. Charles Hindmarch

Chipping away at the brain: adventures at the environment Genome Interface

Dr. Hindmarch is responsible for QGen@QCPU, the new Genomics and Transcriptomics facility at Queen's University.

 In the past 12 years, he has pursued two arms of research, firstly to uncover the role of the brain in regulating the response to osmotic stimuli ( such as dehydration or salt-loading), and secondly to understand the role of the brain in the pathogenesis and maintenance of high blood pressure in response to various modifiable and un-modifiable risk factors.

Dr. Hindmarch has employed high-throughput transcriptomics such as microarrays and RNAsequencing to identify molecular signatures from specific loci in the rat, mouse and even camel brain in response to physiological and pathological disturbances. 


Dr. Michael Kawaja

Discovery and validation of biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease

Dr. Kawaja did his undergraduate studies in biology at Acadia University and completed his doctoral degree in Anatomy at the University of Western Ontario in 1989. 

In 1993 Dr. Kawaja commenced his MRC-funded scholarship position as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Queen's University. 

Dr. Kawaja is now the Associate Dean of Life Sciences and Biochemistry. He is also at the Co-Director of QuARMS (Queen's University Accelerated Route to Medical School) in the Faculty of Health Sciences. 

He has chaired the biomedical research panels for Ontario Mental Health Foundation and Ontario Ministry for Research and Innovation, and has served on peer review grants committees for the Alzheimer Society of Canada, CIHR, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada etc.


Dr. Douglas Munoz

Neural circuitry controlling visual fixation and the generation of saccadic eye movements, and using our knowledge of this circuitry to probe a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimers, Tourette’s Syndrome and ALS

Doug Munoz received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 1988 in Neurology and Neurosurgery followed by a Post-doctoral Fellow at McGill and subsequently at the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.   He came to Queen’s in 1991 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology.  He currently holds a position of Professor in the Departments of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences and Medicine, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and is the Director of the Centre for Neuroscience Studies.  Dr. Munoz is the past-President of the Canadian Association for Neuroscience and the Vice President of the Neural Control of Movement. 

The main goals of his research are devoted to: 1) understanding the neural circuitry controlling visual fixation and the generation of saccadic eye movements, and 2) using our knowledge of this circuitry to probe a variety of neurological and psychiatricdisorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimers, Tourette’s Syndrome and ALS.


Dr. Sarosh Khalid-Khan

MD, DABPN, Associate Professor, Chair of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry ; How the brain changes in Depressed and Anxious Adolescents who receive Psychotherapy and Medications

"I am a child and adolescent psychiatrist. I completed my psychiatric training at the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania (UPENN), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I worked as Medical Director of the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Section at University of Pennsylvania (UPENN) before joining the faculty at Queen’s University in 2008.

Currently I am on staff at the Hotel Dieu Hospital in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry where I manage the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Clinic and consult to the Eating Disorders Team. I have implemented anxiety prevention programs in collaboration with the Limestone District School Board in Kingston.

I have implemented a stepped care Dialectal Behaviour Therapy Program for adolescents with chronic suicidal ideation, recurrent self- harm, severe mood dysregulation and impulsive behaviour. My clinical research focuses on describing this population and also working on finding a diagnostic tool. My goals are to enhance access for treatment for adolescents and their families ; I am working on delivery of psychotherapies via technology to increase access in remote areas."